FAQs

FAQs

Is it important for your kid to learn how to read and write? Is it because they grow up to be journalists or professional writers? At Creo, we consider coding to be an extension of writing. It is “interactive writing”. Whether your kid grows up to be the next programing wizard or not, coding is a highly useful skill that teaches vital problem-solving, logical thought development, creativity, communication and collaboration. All this, while being fun.
There is really no right or wrong age to introduce computers to kids. The ability to design and develop technology is an acquired skill. It is easier to learn anything - a new language, ride a bike or swim - when you are younger. Similarly, computers and programming are easier to pick up for young minds and are likely to last longer.
In this day and age when all kinds of information is accessible on the internet, safety should be a concern. Much like deciding when your kid can go out alone or to buy their first bike, it is your parenting style and values that will eventually keep your kids safe.
The curriculum at Creo is designed by professionals who have a long history in teaching students in elementary school and middle school. Developed in consultation with educational technologies professors, the hands-on curriculum uses the natural development of young minds to teach all the classes. Creo does not merely teach kids to assemble the building blocks.
Creo is not an activity that kids put an extra effort to learn. Rather, it unwinds the brain by bringing out their natural creativity in an enjoyable manner, very much like a hobby. Numerous studies showed that having a hobby induces relaxation.
This is a very personal decision. Creo focuses on skills that are not developed as part of the common school curriculum and yet, are extremely important in the next generation workforce. Examples of such skills include clarity of thought, ability to critically evaluate different solutions to a problem and collaboration. Kids develop these necessary skills as they work their way through the different classes.
This is similar to asking whether a teacher should home-school their kids. While the answer depends on the availability of time, your teaching style and personal preference, teaching coding at home tends to deprive kids of the social interaction component involved in collaborative projects. Creo strongly encourages reflection and evaluation of the lessons to be home-based activities.
Just as with reading and writing, there really is no end to learning coding. With each successful project, there is something new that can be learnt and created. It is only one’s creativity that limits how far one could go in coding. With an early start in coding, kids will have a proven advantage in general learning ability, computational thought process, creativity and thinking fluidity – all of which translate into successful life skills.

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